Workshops + Events 2017

The role of our workshops at the Sacred Gardener, has become crystal clear over the last two decades—we’re re-membering culture, sharing vision and teaching skills of traditional living: indigenous skills, herbalism, permaculture and sustainable building.

With all of our workshops, the aim is always the same—to make the Earth come alive for our visitors who have lost touch with Her and to enable them to become part of an extended community that keeps this sacred knowledge alive.

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Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds





 


Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Forage and Feast: Spring

May 6, 2017
Instructors: Megan Spencer and Steven Martyn

This is the first of Megan and Steven series of one-day Forage and Feast events. This is a dream day, for Foodies, Wild Food enthusiasts and people into practicing Traditional Skills. We will meet in the morning, after the night’s dew has been offered to the sun. Then we’ll walk to wild land, learn about wild plants and forage till noon. We’ll come back to have a served, local, wild infused, organic lunch. In the afternoon, we’ll focus on processing, preparing and cooking the food we collected. We’ll finish the day with an early farm-style dinner.

At this time of year the Earth offers us an abundance of food and medicine to cleanse and rebuild our bodies after the long winter. The teachings of this time, directly after the long winter, when we need plants that are cleansing and revitalizing. These plants mostly consist of sweet roots and early greens, perfect to detoxify and build our strength. As the early greens develop they will have more flavour, nutrients and gentle medicine.

The Earth gives us what we need, when we need it.
Many people have heard this adage, but few deeply understand it and are steeped enough in traditional Earth wisdom to know how to receive the gifts of the season. Some folks might know what fiddleheads to eat or how to identify wild leeks, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. The deeper knowledge is in what these plants do for the Earth and for our bodies. In a course a couple years ago, we were told by someone documenting the teachings, that we’d  looked at how to eat well over over one hundred different plants. All of which require not only clear identification (often at times when plants are difficult to identify—early or late in the season) but the knowledge as to when and how (physically and ethically) to harvest them. To safely consume and use these powerful plants, we must also have the knowledge of how to prepare, process and store them. In this workshop not only will you taste the nutrition and gain the regional traditional knowledge for harvesting, storing and preparing these food, you will learn how to elevate the plants taste! So a wild artichoke or leek or fiddle head’s flavour sings out an essence of the place where the plant was harvested.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Forage and Feast: Summer

July 8, 2017
Instructors: Megan Spencer and Steven Martyn

This is the second of Megan and Steven’s series of one-day Forage and Feast events. This is a dream day, for Foodies, Wild Food enthusiasts and people into practicing Traditional Skills. We will meet in the morning, after the night’s dew has been offered to the sun. Then we’ll walk from the farm to wild land, learn about the plants we see this time of year and forage till noon. We’ll come back to have a served, local, wild infused, organic lunch. In the afternoon, we’ll focus on processing, preparing and cooking the food we collected. We’ll finish the day with an early farm-style dinner.

At this time of year, early summer, the Earth offers us a bounty of flowers and early fruit. While it might not be the best time for harvesting wild food it is the best time of year for learning to identify edible wild plants because they’re full grown and many are in flower. In the morning we’ll harvest an abundance of edible flowers, greens and if we’re lucky, the pin cherries we be ripe and ready. There are a few good tricks for harvesting and processing these sweet little wild cherries. Foods like rich greens and small fruit help our body have lots of energy for the long summer days. And the flavanoids and other complex chemicals, micro nutrients and minerals in the foods this time of year also begin to rebuild our body’s reserves.

The Earth gives us what we need, when we need it.
Many people have heard this adage, but few deeply understand it and are steeped enough in traditional Earth wisdom to know how to receive the gifts of the season. Some folks might know what fiddleheads to eat or how to identify wild leeks, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. The deeper knowledge is in what these plants do for the Earth and for our bodies. In a course a couple years ago, we were told by someone documenting the teachings, that we’d  looked at how to eat well over over one hundred different plants. All of which require not only clear identification (often at times when plants are difficult to identify—early or late in the season) but the knowledge as to when and how (physically and ethically) to harvest them. To safely consume and use these powerful plants, we must also have the knowledge of how to prepare, process and store them. In this workshop not only will you taste the nutrition and gain the regional traditional knowledge for harvesting, storing and preparing these food, you will learn how to elevate the plants taste! So a wild artichoke or leek or fiddle head’s flavour sings out an essence of the place where the plant was harvested.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Forage Feast Ferment: Wild Brews

August 5, 2017
Instructors: Megan Spencer and Steven Martyn

Megan and Steven have co-created a series of one day Forage and Feast events together, as a ‘dream day for Foodies’, Wild Food enthusiasts, and people into practicing Traditional Skills. We will meet in the morning, after the night’s dew has been offered to the sun. Then we’ll walk to wild land, and learn about wild plants and forage till noon. We’ll come back to have a served local, wild infused, organic lunch. In the afternoon, we’ll focus on processing, preparing and cooking the food we collected. We’ll finish the day with an early farm-style dinner.

At this time of year the Earth offers us an abundance of food and medicine to cleanse and rebuild our bodies after the long winter. The teachings of this time, directly after the long winter, when we need plants that are cleansing and revitalizing. These plants mostly consist of sweet roots and early greens, perfect to detoxify and build our strength. As the early greens develop they will have more flavour, nutrients and gentle medicine.

The Earth gives us what we need, when we need it. Many people have heard this adage, but few deeply understand it and are steeped enough in traditional Earth wisdom to know how to receive the gifts of the season. Some folks might know what fiddleheads to eat or how to identify wild leeks, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. In a course a couple years ago we were told by someone documenting the teachings, that we looked at how to eat over over one hundred different plants. All of which require not only clear identification (often at times when plants are difficult to identify—early or late in the season) but the knowledge as to when and how (physically and ethically) to harvest them. To safely consume and use these powerful plants, we must also have the knowledge of how to prepare, process and store them. And as part of tasting the nutrition, and gaining the regional traditional knowledge for harvesting, storing and preparing the food, there’s the ability to elevate the taste! So a wild artichoke or leek or fiddle head’s flavour sings the essence of that plant, and the place where we harvested it.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Forage and Feast: Fall

October 14, 2017
Instructors: Megan Spencer and Steven Martyn

This is the third of Megan and Steven series of one-day Forage and Feast events. This is a dream day, for Foodies, Wild Food enthusiasts and people into practicing Traditional Skills. We will meet in the morning, after the night’s dew has been offered to the sun. Then we’ll walk to wild land, learn about wild plants and forage till noon. We’ll come back to have a served, local, wild infused, organic lunch. In the afternoon, we’ll focus on processing, preparing and cooking the food we collected. We’ll finish the day with an early farm-style dinner.

At this time of year, where we live, the above ground plants have all been frosted. But the plants have collected in their seasons wealth of medicine and nurtients, into their roots and seeds. In the morning we will survey this wealth and with thanks will harvest some of the stored bounty of seeds and roots. We crave this seasons rich ‘thanksgiving’ tastes because they are exactly what we need.The plants at this time of year are preparing for winter so they have transformed themselves into the very thing they need, and we need, to have the stamina we need to get through the winter, complex carbohydrates, proteins and oils. Like the plants we also need to learn to store these treasures for the long cold season.

The Earth gives us what we need, when we need it.
Many people have heard this adage, but few deeply understand it and are steeped enough in traditional Earth wisdom to know how to receive the gifts of the season. Some folks might know what fiddleheads to eat or how to identify wild leeks, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. The deeper knowledge is in what these plants do for the Earth and for our bodies. In a course a couple years ago, we were told by someone documenting the teachings, that we’d  looked at how to eat well over over one hundred different plants. All of which require not only clear identification (often at times when plants are difficult to identify—early or late in the season) but the knowledge as to when and how (physically and ethically) to harvest them. To safely consume and use these powerful plants, we must also have the knowledge of how to prepare, process and store them. In this workshop not only will you taste the nutrition and gain the regional traditional knowledge for harvesting, storing and preparing these food, you will learn how to elevate the plants taste! So a wild artichoke or leek or fiddle head’s flavour sings out an essence of the place where the plant was harvested.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


The Herbal Healers

June 23–25, 2017
Instructor: Steven Martyn

This course is aimed at re-introducing you to your lost relations, the Herbal Healers! Whether you’re a trained herbalist or a beginner, you may have never met these herbal Kings and Queens in their own realm; never seen and experienced them in their summer glory. This workshop focuses on a traditional folk practice of shamanistic healing with plants.

When we experience the plants in this way, we come to see that their physical attributes embody deeper characteristics, which are keys to the plant’s spirit. The mysterious ‘Doctrine of Signatures’ becomes crystal clear, moving from the realm of superstition, to a mythical science of associative forms and aesthetic.

After a day of learning from the plants what their ‘medicine’ is, the second day of the workshop will involve an exercise in Intuitive Healing, with the wild plants around the farm. Later, in a sacred circle, we’ll voluntarily share our intuitions. With the support of Steven’s intimate knowledge of the herbs, the insights from our journeys with the plants begin to come together. Often with startling accuracy.

The group sharing, of insights and knowledge, specific to each person and plant, enables everybody to learn and have access to a much greater range of plant medicine, and a more direct understanding of the deeper magic that the herbal healers hold.

Participants will leave with some herb seeds or plant start.


The Herbalist’s Medicine Bag

August 18–20, 2017
Instructor: Steven Martyn

In this second workshop in the Herbalist series, we will work with the plant Healers we met in the first workshop, learning more about them, though practicing traditional methods for drying and making decoctions, infusions, concoctions, tinctures, salves, creams, vinegars, wines, syrups and elixirs.

  Our days will be spent between spending a good amount of time outside looking at and foraging for wild plants and processing the herbs we’ve collected.

Each plant has its own spiritual medicine and temperament. Each part of the plant requires its own special treatment. When we are working with a plant’s flower, its essence can be easily distilled, but can also be easily lost. So, a gentle approach is needed. Seeds and roots are generally dense and need a more intense approach to draw out the medicine.

Over time, as herbalists, we develop a tool kit, so that just like the old-time doctor or medicine man, we can have our medicine bag at the ready, for when it is needed. This session will bring you a long way toward getting a year-round medicine kit ready.


‘Clinical’ Use of Local Herbs

September 22–24, 2017
The Sacred Gardener Farm

To come to the third ‘clinic’ workshop you must have come to one of the first two herbal workshops or a previous year’s herbal workshop.

In this third and final workshop of the Herbal series ‘Clinical’ Use of Local Herbs we bring it all together. You’ve come to know the The Herbal Healers (session 1) and have the The Herbalist’s Tools for using the herbs (session 2), now it’s time to learn to diagnose and apply your intuition and knowledge to a real human being. This session will start with teachings to help the participants grasp certain perspectives and techniques that are central to the art of healing people. Starting the first day and into the second day we’ll practice many ‘clinic’ exercises, with each other, and willing visitors. I use the word clinic here, more to describe a herbalist’s professional approach to clients, rather than to justify this course as a basis for professional practice, which it is not. But I think having a serious professional approach, particularly with family and friends is important, so the opportunities for healing aren’t clouded by personal bias.

In running through a ‘clinical visit’ we see what questions and approaches are taken to getting information. We’ll follow the process through to choosing the right herb, applied with the most effective technique, at the right dosage.

As every plant is different, so too is every person. We focused on the plants in the first workshop, processing and storing the medicine in the second and in this workshop we’ll focus on people and application of the personalized herbal remedies. By understanding the client’s different “bodies”, and learning to listen and see them clearly enough to know which body to treat, and how to treat it, takes years. No matter how long you’ve been doctoring people, nobody can master the mysteries of our body’s health. That’s why it’s called a ‘practice’. But, knowing the plants, knowing the preparations and being able to read people well, is a good start toward making ‘response-able’ decisions about what the herbal remedy should be given and in what dosage.

In some instances, with some people, using a very light or homeopathic dose is whats needed, whereas other times we need a macro dose over longer periods, and everything in-between.

Because every person and every situation is different, we as healers should not be trained in memorized responses but rather have a intimate understanding of our local medicines and of the whole human, so that we can actually ’respond’ to people as an individuals, and channel the right remedy for them.

  • ‘Clinical’ Use of Local Herbs

    $285.00 Add to cart

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Herbal Medicine Series

All three herbal medicine workshops- save $150

 2017 herbal workshop series consists of three intensive weekend workshops, at different times of the year (for learning seasonal practices and identification at different times in the plant’s cycle – and for have time between to digesting/practice).

These sessions are designed for people wanting to heal themselves, their families and friends.

The first two workshops can be taken independently, although we would encourage you to take the complete series. To come to the third ‘clinic’ workshop you must have come to one of the first two herbal workshops or a previous years herbal workshop.

 The Herbal Healers                              June 23-25,2017
This course is aimed at re-introducing you to your lost relations, the Herbal Healers! Whether you’re a trained herbalist or a beginner, you may have never met these herbal Kings and Queens in their own realm; never seen and experienced them in their summer glory. This workshop focuses on a traditional folk practice of shamanistic healing with plants.
The Herbalist’s Medicine Bag
           August 18-20, 2017
In this second workshop in the Herbalist series, we will work with the plant Healers we met in the first workshop, learning more about them, though practicing traditional methods for drying and making decoctions, infusions, concoctions, tinctures, salves, creams, vinegars, wines, syrups and elixirs.
Our days will be spent between spending a good amount of time outside looking at and foraging for wild plants and processing the herbs we’ve collected.
‘Clinical’ Use of Local Herbs             September 22-24, 2017
In this third and final workshop of the Herbal series ‘Clinical’ Use of Local Herbs we bring it all together. You’ve come to know the The Herbal Healers (session 1) and have the The Herbalist’s Tools for using the herbs (session 2), now it’s time to learn to diagnose and apply your intuition and knowledge to a real human being. This session will start with teachings to help the participants grasp certain perspectives and techniques that are central to the art of healing people. Starting the first day and into the second day we’ll practice many ‘clinic’ exercises, with each other, and willing visitors. I use the word clinic here, more to describe a herbalist’s professional approach to clients, rather than to justify this course as a basis for professional practice, which it is not. But I think having a serious professional approach, particularly with family and friends is important, so the opportunities for healing aren’t clouded by personal bias.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Sacred Gardener School

May 10–14, 2017
August 30–September 3, 2017
Instructor: Steven Martyn

The Sacred Gardener School is for those inspired to move into a deeper level of being; to live in a connected, sustainable and soulfully present way with the Earth. The school will foster your growth over time, enabling you to embody the living skills and ceremony needed to engage the larger spirit and ecology of the Earth, so She may bless and redirect our collective and personal path.

Many pieces must be in place for these teachings to unfold within us. To move into this deeper sacred space and then to be able to carry the knowledge in our life, takes years of personal work, a supportive community and guidance from elders who have gone through the transformation. The continuance of the Sacred Gardener School will afford our soul these gifts. The School and land Herself give students safety and nourishment to grow into a thick grape vine, that flows up, through and over the spiny armature of our life, bringing beauty and bearing heavy fruit.

At The Sacred Gardener we teach these skills and practices, not in an abstract detached way, but experientially, as we live them. Through these experiences, the culture of these arts inoculates the student. These arts, these cultures want to grow again, they want to be fed. When we connect with the Earth through them, they are being fed, and we in turn get fed, sheltered, clothed and healed. It’s a good deal for everyone.

These old arts are living beings that can open the way back to our ancestry and our mythic roots. They are mysterious gifts that lay at the foundation of our civilization. But these mysteries that we wed long ago, must be practiced within a sacred context or they lose their magic and become just another commodity, collecting dust with our other badges and trophies on a shelf in our mind.

At the Sacred Gardener we will help these living beings claim you, help you and them find a home again. These arts are an essential part of our humanity, and they are our inheritance. Handed down from our ancestors, these ancient ways form a chalice for us to carry the ‘holy’ to the next generation; and for us to sustain our soul. When we claim back these rites, we drink deeply from the holy and the wild elixir turns our life into art; into ceremony to feed the deep unnamable mystery that sustains us each moment.

Simply said, these sacred arts and practices ground, transform and elevate our daily routines. So, while we might have felt lost in the daily “grind”, we feel a daily rite of passage that keeps us aligned and connected with our soul, our ancestors and the spirit of the land.

Through the continued guidance and community of the school, through the nourishment to our wild soul, our spirit will rise up from the deepest spring of our being into wholeness, and pour out over the walls of our heart-well in wisdom and gratitude.

What would the time in the school look like, relative to a workshop?

The workshops the Sacred Gardener offers are intensives, and so, for the most part while many “spiritual teachings” are shared, there is only time for physical activities, for learning the work and arts of homesteading and healing. But the harvesting and crafting are only a part of the circle we must practice to become whole human beings. The other primary piece is in the giving. And in hosting the full-emptiness of meditative perception, that is able to receive the blessings, grace and wisdom of Nature.

The school will afford us the time to offer sweet smoke to our Grandfather Sun, to help Him cross the sky, time to pour out milk and blood to feed the Moon and Earth. Time to offer mead, bread and fruit to the happy ancestors, and to the ghosts that haunt our life for want of food. All walking side by side with learning the traditional living skills and crafts.

In the school, I will endeavour to bring you with me; to bring you to a place where you can divine the present and future through the flight birds, where our thoughts are answered by a movement of Wind. Where the ancestors speak to you, laughing back from the coals of the fire. Where we court the Earth with art and She reveals Her wishes to us, and we have the ability to manifest Her dream through our skill. Where Her plants whisper their healing secrets to us in the twilight dew, and for our devotion and prayers She offers Herself to nourish us. Where we take the time to watch and learn from the animals, our older brothers and sisters how to build, craft and live in a good way with the Earth.

When we are with the Earth in this way She is constantly informing us, personally, locally and globally. A thousand messengers pour through our senses, the birds, animals, mist, fire, or dancing moonlight in a midnight forest. Like us, all these living beings hold information and want to whisper their secret knowings into an open ear, and open heart.

 


Wildculturing

July 27–30
The Sacred Gardener Farm and The Madawaska Forest Garden

In this three day intensive workshop Participants will experience first hand the remote Indigenous forest garden on the Madawaska River. This garden is based on the Native gardening practice of using successional polyculture. The Madawaska Forest garden is almost twenty years old, and very few people have ever seen it. The other central parts of the workshop take place on more familiar terrain;  the farms old fields.

Over the years Steven and helpers have turned a few of these acres of exhausted farmland into rich, diverse ecologies. Different terrains on the farm have lent themselves to different methods of integrated gardening such as no-till, lasagna, permaculture, and polyculture orchards. These gardens on the Madawaska and at Golden Lake demonstrate different aspects of co-creative gardening that physically and spiritually honour our ancient contract with the Wild.

This course promises to be a journey of experiential learning, vastly different from any other agriculture course including permaculture courses. The Sacred Gardener courses take you out of the theory and into experience, which integrates and grounds the abstraction of intellectual concepts underlying the work.

The course’s guide is Steven Martyn, who lives with his family, working as a teacher and farmer at the Sacred Gardener farm in Golden Lake. Steven has gardened personally and professionally, in many different challenging environments for over thirty years. His approach to gardening is unique, in part because he learned how to forage before he learned how to garden. This, and time he spent with the Lacodon Maya, shaped his vision and approach to wild gardening or “wildculturing”, in which the natural elements of the land and Her gifts are received and honoured with deep appreciation.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Fermentation Fest

September 29 to October 1, 2017
Instructors: Megan Spencer and Steven Martyn

This final workshop in the Wild Food Series for the year, is set for a whole weekend because there’s just no way to fit in a respectable amount of learning about fermented foods into one day. During this workshop run by Megan and Steven we will spend time outside each day exploring the world of the wild yeast, while harvesting vegetables and herbs for the days ferments. And well spent time hands-on making the ferments.

During this workshop you will learn how to make sourdough bread, kimchi and sauerkraut and miso made with our beans and wild plants. 

There will be tastings galore! You’ll take home your own litre of kimchi or sauerkraut.

Click for… Workshop Details | What You’ll Need | Daily Schedule | Location | Meals | Refunds


Workshops Details

To help our guests become deeply, spiritually and personally connected with the real Earth is our goal. Part of the journey to becoming connected is to reconnect with our selves; grieving and healing. When the seed of wisdom that resides within all of us awakens with this deeper (watering) connection it naturally begins to grow. As this indigenous wisdom grows and blooms within us, a more meaningful dimension is revealed and the World literally comes alive. When this happens our guests go home with a new vision of Nature, and a host of relationships with the plants, animals, people and other relations. These relations who have come alive for them during the workshop can act as their teachers and guides even in the depths of the city.

Part of keeping the spirit of the Earth alive in our hearts involves rekindling these first deep connections when our fire runs low. This is why over the years of running workshops at The Sacred Gardener, we’ve noticed many of the participants return annually or in different seasons. Each time people come back they see new things and connect more deeply with this land.

Overwhelmingly, what people loved and want more of, from Algonquin College where I (Steven) teach and from those at the Sacred Gardener workshops, is the “hands-on experience”. When we are in the right place and we have been instructed in how to approach medicinal plants, our bodies receive direct teachings from the plants themselves. Because of the feedback and our move back to longer workshops in 2015, we will set aside a few hours each day for hands-on farm tasks. These tasks are very diverse and happen in accordance with the time of year, the plants, the weather and the needs of the farm. Much of the work will be plant related seasonal activities such as planting, weeding, harvesting and processing herbs and food. But our guests in this coming years might also be working a day or two making a cob floor or building a grape trellis or a hundred other small jobs that keep the farm running and growing. Because everything is so connected at the farm even unrelated tasks bring surprising insights and revelations to the workshop topic.

For part of the day we will also share in an intensive workshop format, with a teacher and hands-on demonstrations in the kitchen and field. Each day participants are also given time for themselves and encouraged to “find a spot” to sit and reconnect with the Earth.

Food is given priority at the farm here, growing, harvesting, preparation and eating. So as an integral part of our guest’s stay here, we will also spend a good amount of time attending to our food. Over the years Megan has mastered cooking for everyone including those with dietary restrictions but she has struggled a bit with how much to ask for help from the workshop participants. Not having guests involved with food preparation and clean up was a mistake. And not just because Megan would be caught with so much work but because there are so many teachings and stories that go with food. When guests go to the farm to help with preparation, growing, caring for and harvesting the food then there are many gaps in their connection to the Earth that get filled in. The majority of our food is off the farm or from local organic producers so when we eat we are connecting into the lives and land of all the local growers. The food is our communion. It strengthens all the participants bonds to this place and each other in a real way and deepens the experience of the workshop. In eating together we are ritually enacting life’s sacred union, a ceremony that ties everything together.


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What You’ll Need to Bring

Please bring clothing to be prepared for all kinds of weather. Rain gear (waterproof coat with hood and boots), a toque, wool socks, longjohns and a sweater are recommended. For the warmer days, bring light-coloured, lightweight, long-sleeves and long pants in case of bugs (they are repelled by light colours). Also bring a hat with a brim and bug repellent (Burt’s Bees is what we use) and a bathing suit to take a dip in the pond at the end of the day!

If you are tenting, bring your own ground cover, tent, sleeping bag, pillow—anything you’ll need to be comfortable. Dorm spaces are provided with bedding and pillows, for a small fee. There are also nearby cabins, motels and B&Bs we can recommend upon request.

  • alarm clock
  • flashlight
  • toothbrush, facecloth, towel, other toiletries

We have a communal outhouse with washing station, and our enclosed outdoor shower and sink for washing. Please be sure your shampoo and soap do not contain Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, or any of its relatives, as the water from the shower is on a grey water system, and goes back into the land here. If you are unsure, there will be both shampoo and soap provided that you are welcome to use.

If you are an early morning riser, we have an outdoor kitchen, where you can make yourself a cup of tea or coffee.


Daily Schedule

The first day of the workshop is considered an arrival day, with arrival time at 4 pm. We will gather for our first meal together at 5 pm. The second day we will meet for breakfast at 8:30 am, start at 9 am, and finish at around 4 pm, with a lunch break and rest time afterwards. The last day of the workshop we will end at noon.


Location

All workshops  take place in the Upper Ottawa Valley, either at our farm in Golden Lake or at our property in Whitney, both of which are accessible by bus. The distance to drive is about 1.5 hours from Ottawa and 4.5 hours from Toronto or Montreal.


Meals

We’re flexible, mostly ovo-lacto vegetarian food but can accommodate vegans as well as most allergies. We encourage participation in clean up. We find a rich balance happens at meals, through everyone’s eclectic taste and experience, nutritional information and political views, balanced by the simplicity of what’s coming out of the ground.


Refunds

Full refunds will be offered up to 1 month in advance of the course, minus processing fees. No refunds after that, thank you for your understanding.

For booking or other questions please call us at 613-625-1106 or email megan.